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Engine Remanufacturing

Magnus Engineered Equipment (MEE) has been supplying cleaning equipment to leaders in the remanufacturing industry since the 1950’s. The remanufacturing process begins with a thorough cleaning of engine blocks and associated components so they can be properly inspected.  Removal of carbon, oil and grease, paint and other contaminants in necessary to inspect for microcracks and to make accurate measurements.  In addition, blocks, heads, connecting rods, crankshafts and camshafts are thoroughly cleaned to remove contaminants that can result in premature wear to internal engine components and early engine failure.

MEE has supplied thousands of cleaning systems to the remanufacturing industry and these systems generally employ immersion agitation to clean the substrates.  Recently, there has been interest in incorporating ultrasonic cleaning technology in order to more thoroughly clean oil passages and other hard to clean areas.

Ultrasonic cleaning utilizes transducers which convert electrical energy into acoustic energy in the cleaning solution.  Cavitation bubbles are formed which aggressively and quickly clean the substrate.  MEE supplies 20 kHz magnetostrictive transducers which deliver the highest cleaning power in the industry.  Unlike the more common piezoelectric transducers, magnetostrictive transducers are better suited for cleaning large substrates such as engine blocks, and MEE transducers deliver approximately 25 times more cleaning power than the 40 kHz piezoelectric transducers.

Figure 1 – A typical Heavy Duty Cleaning Tank for Heavy Loads

MEE equipment is well suited for handling large and heavy substrates.  Engine blocks in excess of 5000 lbs can be cleaned via immersion agitation and ultrasonic cleaning.  Figure 1 shows a typical cleaning tank supplied by MEE and Figure 2 and 3 show before and after pictures of engine components cleaned with MEE ultrasonics.  The use of 20 kHz ultrasonic cleaning coupled with immersion agitation cleaning delivers the most thorough and fastest cleaning for engine remanufacturing.

 

Before Cleaning After Cleaning with 20kHz Ultrasonics

Figure 2: Before and After Pictures of an Engine Block cleaned with 20kHz magnetostrictive ultrasonics

Before Cleaning After Cleaning with 20kHz Ultrasonics

Figure 3: Before and After Pictures of an Engine Components cleaned with 20kHz magnetostrictive

Achieving Excellent Part Cleaning with Maximum Water and Energy Savings

Magnus Engineered Equipment (MEE) has been providing cleaning solutions for our industry partners since its founding in the 1950’s.  MEE supplies the majority of gun manufacturer’s with cleaning equipment and recently worked with one such customer to solve a challenging barrel cleaning problem.  An immersion cleaning system was designed, constructed and tested and the cleanliness results exceeded those delivered by more costly and inefficient pressurized cleaning systems.  The system was fully contained and minimized water and energy consumption with filtration and oil coalescence technology.  Consistent and repeatable cleaning is achieved while minimizing water and energy usage, and cleaning chemistry usage and disposal.

MEE’s experienced staff of engineers can solve most cleaning challenges and welcomes an opportunity to work with you to solve your cleaning requirement, or modernize an existing cleaning operation to achieve:

  • Water conservation
  • Energy conservation
  • Cleaning chemistry conservation
  • Waste minimization
  • Elimination of hazardous chemistry
  • Improved safety
  • Increased throughput
  • Consistent and Repeatable cleaning
  • Reduced labor requirement

Are your Ultrasonics Powerful Enough?

Magnus Engineered Equipment (MEE) produces the most powerful ultrasonics for cleaning applications.  MEE manufactures ultrasonic transducers which operate at 20 kHz which is 25 times more powerful than the 40 kHz transducers supplied by other suppliers of cleaning equipment.  The transducers are made with continuously laminated magnetostrictive 20 kHz elements which deliver more uniform cleaning than the discretely mounted piezoelectric elements used in 40 kHz transducers.

Figure 1


Comparison of 20 kHz vs 40 kHz Ultrasonics with Household Aluminum Foil

Figure 1 shows the difference in cleaning power between the two types of transducers.  The 20 kHz transducer will perforate and tear the soft household aluminum foil whereas the less powerful 40 kHz transducers will only dimple the aluminum foil.

Figure 2 shows the difference in construction of 20 and 40 kHz transducers.  The weaker 40 kHz transducers are bonded to a thin stainless steel sheet to minimize the loss of energy from the piezoelectric elements.  The weak stainless can readily flex between the elements and thus transfer the energy to the cleaning solution.  This thin stainless steel sheet is prone to develop porosity and limits the 40 kHz transducer to a lifetime of 2-3 years.  The more powerful 20 kHz elements are continuously bonded to a thick stainless steel sheet which prevents porosity and greatly extends the life of the transducer.  The uniform bonding delivers a more uniformly sonicated cleaning solution which in turn delivers more uniform cleaning.

Figure 2